Wooden Roof Tiles Covered With Lawn, Norwegian roof

Wooden Roof Tiles Covered With Lawn, Norwegian roof


In Norway, the main construction material has always been a tree. High insulating properties of wood allows you to build a good and warm home. Norwegian houses are distinctive in complicated weather conditions. This is of particular interest in Norwegian housing. Like all of the Scandinavian countries, Norway is surrounded by lush nature. Scandinavians are proud that they use elements of nature rather than conquer it. Roofs in Norway have long been covered with turf, which provides excellent protection from frost and winds. Among other things, they also have vegetation on roofs as part of their landscape. These days’ roofs of modern buildings are covered with grass making it a green roof. Companies like Colorado Roof Toppers have seen an increase in green roofs the last few years.

A sod roof or turf roof is a traditional Scandinavian type of green roof covered with sod on top of several layers of birch bark on gently sloping wooden roof boards. Until the late 19th century it was the most common roof on rural log houses in large parts of Scandinavia. Its distribution roughly corresponds to the distribution of the log building technique in the architecture of Finland and the Scandinavian Peninsula. The load of approximately 250 kg per m² of a sod roof is an advantage because it helps to compress the logs and make the walls more draught-proof. In winter the total load may well increase to 400 or 500 kg per m² because of snow.  Sod is also a reasonably efficient insulator in a cold climate. The birch barks underneath ensures that the roof will be waterproof.

A sod roof or turf roof is a traditional Scandinavian type of green roof covered with sod on top of several layers of birch bark on gently sloping wooden roof boards. Until the late 19th century it was the most common roof on rural log houses in large parts of Scandinavia. Its distribution roughly corresponds to the distribution of the log building technique in the vernacular architecture of Finland  and the Scandinavian peninsula. The load of approximately 250 kg per m² of a sod roof is an advantage because it helps to compress the logs and make the walls more draught-proof. In winter the total load may well increase to 400 or 500 kg per m² because of snow.  Sod is also a reasonably efficient insulator in a cold climate. The birch bark underneath ensures that the roof will be waterproof.