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There is a very voyeuristic part of us that loves to see the inner workings of other people’s homes and Juergen Chill’s photographs feed that interest. His unexpected vantage point and subject matter takes this into a whole new realm.  Apartment Therapy is a place to discuss and discover ways in which to make the space in which you live healthy, beautiful, and functional. Juergen Chill is entering into “personal, intimate locations which not many know,” that stray from the norm, by many standards. By photographing rooms in bordellos and prison cells, he is giving us a glimpse into rooms that are appointed with things other than what we may consider typical motivations for decor.

We can take lightly take the freedom to choose how our surroundings appear. There are many people, however, that don’t have the freedom to exert much control at all. “Those that do not have it must adjust to whatever opportunities exist and strive to create their own place.” Juergen Chill has entered into the “homes” of prisoners in Germany, and given us a unique perspective on the rooms in which they spend a great deal of their lives. In a parallel universe, Chill has also granted us a peek at the rooms within a bordello. Clearly, the inspiration for the decor in these rooms may be different from what most consider. All of Chill’s photographs are done from a unique aerial perspective, and are at once intriguing and unsettling. Take a look at more of Juergen Chill’s fascinating work here. Investigate the rooms of others, and enjoy the graphic nature of his photographs.

The East Village Studio designed by JPDA architect is really make a big impression on its statement. The apartment located only 46 square meters and was built as a little nest for the owners who also work here. You probably wonder how this was possible.  The wood gives this home its warmth which is “intensified” by the friendly vegetation pots spread around the open studio.  The uncommon crib houses ingenious solutions that counterweight the lack of space.
It has all the utilities a common looking contemporary home has and dare we say a lot more. This original crib has storage space and shelves in the most unusual and unexpected places, reducing clutter and contributing to a clean and fresh interior design. While the footprint of the apartment is minimal, meticulously detailed millwork conceals extensive amounts of storage and shelving; thereby maximizing floor space. The aesthetic is clean and concise, while providing the warmth of a home and functional desires of the client.

Space maximization is a growing trend lately in apartment design. Countries like China make enormous efforts to come up with ideas for small places due to the fact that their urban population is increasing at a rate never encountered before. Here is another tiny crib that manages to maximize space and create a cozy living environment as well.

Economy, functionality and privacy were the primary drivers in the design of this sixth floor home office studio. Meticulously detailed millwork provides ample storage, making this small-footprint apartment extremely efficient. A bedroom loft creates space for a roomy walk-in closet below, while stair risers conceal a series of built-in drawers. Every inch of the space has been effectively exploited. JPDA worked closely with the client and a demanding co-op board through every stage of the design process. The result is modern, clean, and concise, providing both the warmth of a home and all the functional requirements of an office.

“Casa de Karton” is the name of Don Lucho’s  project where he has built an apartment using carton and paper. The apartment has all the furniture and other items that a kitchen or a bedroom is expected to have. Being in these “carton rooms” will make you feel like you’re a part of a drawing.
Beside the house he has also made a car wreck out of carton, and placed it on the street so it looks realistic.
In similarity to this project, another artist made a key card hotel in New York using 200 000 card keys.  Don Lucho’s has built an apartment using carton and paper called “Casa de Karton”. The apartment has all the furniture and other items that a kitchen or a bedroom is expected to have.

Cardboard houses and cardboard coffins, but never have we seen cardboard applied on such an impressive and artful scale. Artist  Don Lucho is taking this corrugated material and creating entire 3-D worlds depicting real life scenarios. Certainly not one to shy away from the limelight, his sculptures have made traffic-stopping appearances all over the streets of Santiago, Chile in the form of crashed cars, fallen airplanes – and as an attempt to move deeper into the human psyche – a more familiar account of the dwellings we occupy.

One amazing aspect of Lucho’s work is his attention to detail. The hubcaps on a car, a roll of toilet paper, and the fold of a blanket – a true reflection of some of life’s undemanding, but ever apparent details we often miss. And as an exercise in how eco-friendliness can easily be merged with art, his pieces have been thoughtfully made from recycled materials.
Infused with a sentiment not too far off from that of kids playing in an upturned cardboard refrigerator box, this project easily embodies the imagination of play, but with a much more surprising, mature and dire twist.

This 182 square foot apartment belongs to airplane interior designer Steve Sauer. Steve obviously likes everything in its place and a place for everything. It is 11’ 3” wide, by 16’ 2” deep, by 10’ 4’ tall and there is plenty of room for Steve and all of his living accoutrements.  Inspired by boats, Sauer’s tiny Seattle home is pretty remarkable. Style living space with full kitchen, full bathroom, soaking tub, a cafe area and a video lounge.  While the aforementioned amenities  may make the tiny condo unit sound even smaller, Sauer mentioned he’s had a party of ten over with zero issues.  With a vision of maximizing usage of all living spaces without being cluttered, I’d say Sauer has done a superb job.  We can’t wait to see his vision of an entire building filled with efficiently spaced units come to fruition.

The entire apartment has three living levels in a 11-feet-3-inches wide, by 16-feet-2-inches deep, by 10-feet-4-inches tall space. It contains two beds, a full kitchen with dishwasher, a bathroom with shower, closet space, a dining table, and storage for two bikes. One of the major design secrets was to include three living levels within the space and to fill the apartment with furniture from IKEA. I’m guessing closet space just isn’t happening though.

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