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Sou Fujimoto, a Japanese architect, designed this small and primitive house to showcase the versatility of lumber. By using large beams that are 350mm sqaure, walls, ceiling, floors and nooks are created. The design of stepped space was a long time fascination of the designer – its defining characteristics of a sort of spatial relativity can not be achieved using coplanar floors. Lumber is extremely versatile. In an ordinary wooden architecture, lumber is effectively differentiated according to functions in various localities precisely because it is so versatile. Columns, beams, foundations, exterior walls, interior walls, ceilings, floorings, insulations, furnishings, stairs, window frames, meaning all. There are no separations of floor, wall, and ceiling here. A place that one thought was a floor becomes a chair, a ceiling, a wall from various positions. The floor levels are relative and spatiality is perceived differently according to one’s position. Here, people are distributed three-dimensionally in the space. This bungalow no longer fits the category of wooden architecture. If wooden architecture is merely something made from wood, then wood itself surpasses the architectural procedures to directly become a “place where people live” in this bungalow.

It is of an existence akin to primitive conditions before architecture. Rather than just a new architecture, this is a new origin, a new existence. Wood is amazingly versatile. Due to its versatility, wood is used in a conventional wooden architecture by intentional differentiation in various places. Not only in structures, such as columns and beams, but it can also be used in everything else from foundation, exterior wall, interior wall, ceiling, flooring, insulation, furniture, stairs to window frames. There are no categorization of floors, walls, and ceilings here. A locality that was thought as a floor transforms into chairs, ceilings, and walls from different perspectives. Floor levels are relative and people reinterpret the spatiality according to where they are. People are three-dimensionally distributed in space and will experience new sensations of depths. Spaces are not divided but is rather produced as a chance occurrence within fusing elements. Inhabitants discover various functions within those undulations. It is a place akin to nebulous landscape. This resonates with the undifferentiated condition of above-mentioned architectonic elements. Both as a constructional methodology and experiential space, this architecture is synthesized by the fusion of various undifferentiated elements. Here, conventional rules of architecture is nullified. There is neither a plan nor a stabilizing point. This is possible purely because the wood is that versatile. Perhaps it is only possible with wood to be simultaneously the insulation and the structure, the finish and also the furniture. By being composed of the wooden blocks instead of slabs, the method of creating the undifferentiated condition was made clear.

This beautiful house is located in Portland, Oregon. The impressive design has been making for seven years, since 2004. When it just was a simple scratch on drawinng board. It is made by Robert Harvey Oshatz, an architect that involve a lots of his time in making of this wooden house. People around the world like it and and every single of them have different explanation of this . A lover of music, the client wanted a house that not only became part of the natural landscape but also addressed the flow of music. This house evades the mechanics of the camera; it is difficult to capture the way the interior space flows seamlessly through to the exterior. One must actually stroll through the house to grasp its complexities and its connection to the exterior. One example is a natural wood ceiling, floating on curved laminated wood beams, passing through a generous glass wall which wraps around the main living room.

This home was referred to as the Wilkinson Wave House by HGTV Extreme Living. You can see the waves, circles and cylinders, mimicking nature and music. The copper clad roof runs around the courtyard and is turned down to define the entrance. To enter this home, a person walks down a steep driveway and through a small courtyard. The floor then continues out over the slope as the ground rapidly drops away.

This home speaks to all of the senses. Being built on such a steep slope with the living spaces extended onto a deck, heightens the feeling of living in the forest canopy. By the time a person reaches the cantilevered deck amongst the trees, the floor level is about 25 feet above the ground.

A more scenic spot could not have been chosen for this amazing, idyllic Mexican vacation home, designed by artist Gabriel Orozco and architect Tatiana Bilbao. The artist’s touch is evident in this amazing piece or architecture. Set on a rocky plot overlooking the Pacific, this unusual home is a 1:1 scale replica of the Jantar Mantar observatory in New Delhi. The observation deck surrounds a pool – the focal point of this interesting house. Notable too for its simple materials and technologies, this example of modern Mexican architecture is made of simply cast concrete, precast blocks, lime plaster, joinery and wood floors. This unusual house plan consists of just two rooms: a living room and a kitchen, which open to the outdoors. From its outdoor living rooms, panoramic views of sea and sunset are the perfect complement to this modern house design.

A Japanese architect was given 2 specific instructions for building this house: It had to contain a garage with enough place for 9 cars and the possibility of viewing one of them directly in the living room. A tall tree had to fit in the house. That was not an easy job as architect Takuya Tsuchida only disposed of 2000 square feet, but he managed to satisfy his client. To do so, he built a 2-storey building with basement and an elevator to move a car from the garage to the living room. I don’t know what’s the most interesting part, the house itself or all the cars in the garage?
The tiered ceiling structure and fresh interior is accented by tall, palm-like foliage that gives a sense of life to this bright modern home.  Takuya Tsuchida has outdone himself, this is a truly inspired work of interior design for the loft-loving autophile that can’t keep their passions in the garage.

The East Village Studio designed by JPDA architect is really make a big impression on its statement. The apartment located only 46 square meters and was built as a little nest for the owners who also work here. You probably wonder how this was possible.  The wood gives this home its warmth which is “intensified” by the friendly vegetation pots spread around the open studio.  The uncommon crib houses ingenious solutions that counterweight the lack of space.
It has all the utilities a common looking contemporary home has and dare we say a lot more. This original crib has storage space and shelves in the most unusual and unexpected places, reducing clutter and contributing to a clean and fresh interior design. While the footprint of the apartment is minimal, meticulously detailed millwork conceals extensive amounts of storage and shelving; thereby maximizing floor space. The aesthetic is clean and concise, while providing the warmth of a home and functional desires of the client.

Space maximization is a growing trend lately in apartment design. Countries like China make enormous efforts to come up with ideas for small places due to the fact that their urban population is increasing at a rate never encountered before. Here is another tiny crib that manages to maximize space and create a cozy living environment as well.

Economy, functionality and privacy were the primary drivers in the design of this sixth floor home office studio. Meticulously detailed millwork provides ample storage, making this small-footprint apartment extremely efficient. A bedroom loft creates space for a roomy walk-in closet below, while stair risers conceal a series of built-in drawers. Every inch of the space has been effectively exploited. JPDA worked closely with the client and a demanding co-op board through every stage of the design process. The result is modern, clean, and concise, providing both the warmth of a home and all the functional requirements of an office.

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