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French architect Patrick Partouche created a house built of 8 shipping containers. Now it’s a home for a family in Lille, France. This spacious house with a total area of 208 sq. m  has floor-to-ceiling windows with enormous metal blinds that may easily turn the building into a fortress when shut, making the place safe to leave. However, the owners use blinds only for protection against sun heat. 

Schonberg Residence – a unique structure of the architectural studio of American Dialect Design Architects, has long been suspended over the existing garage is quite a traditional home. The unusual house designed for the life of one family, located in Charlotte, NC and breaks all the conventions and architectural “convention” of the area. An ingenious use of simple, complementary shapes and bright colors is rather complex and creates a fresh look at the living space. The integration of built-in furniture and the library is so harmonious, that is by forming a non-trivial boundaries of the suspended home.

In the modern interior living room, bedroom or office, there is always room for a small piece, and even for a few pieces of sweet pastry. So, probably, have decided in the Japanese studio Mizmiz Design, and hence showcased Tokyo design week 2011 a draft of the original table on Cake Table. The triangular shape of the table design alludes to a piece of cake, cut a huge knife from a large, whole dessert.

Modern living meets subterranean splendor in this gorgeous home nestled inside of a 15,000-square foot sandstone cave in Festus, Missouri. Built by Curt and Deborah Sleeper, the underground abode features modern interior spaces that blend with the beautiful unfinished sandstone walls to create an incredible example of energy-efficient architecture. Geothermal heating and smart passive design keeps the interior comfortable while completely eliminating the need for a furnace or air conditioning.

This unique house is located in Missouri, USA and is on sale on Ebay for $300,000. I can’t even imagine how much time and efforts it took to build all this. A three-bedroom home built in a 15,000 sqft cave in Festus, MO, formerly a roller-rink/concert venue that entertained the MC5, Ike and Tina Turner and Ted Nugent. Sounds like a hell of a place to live. It’s got three freshwater springs and there are fourteen waterfalls on the property. Yowza.

Property: 2.8 scenic, partially wooded acres provide excellent privacy and the feel of the country right in the middle of town, just several blocks from shopping, dining, and other conveniences. Geothermal and passive solar keep the home comfortable year-round without a furnace or air conditioning. In spite of the vast size of the home, our energy costs here run about the same as they did in our 800 square-foot starter home. The home naturally stays a little cooler than the average above-ground home, but we found that we acclimated quickly and easily.

One of the most important things to do while furnishing your living room is to get good sofa sets. These are some very creative sofa designs. You can lie, lounge, rest, or sleep on them. They are much more original than a traditional sofa. They come in all different colors, textures, shapes, sizes, and materials. 15 most creative and unique modern sofa design examples! Now all you have to do is pick one.  🙂

Recently some guy decided that perfect way to decorate his 90 square foot apartment was by plastering its walls with 25,000 ping pong balls. For some reason I think he was on to something. The apartment is a small loft attached to the offices of Snarkitecture, the architecture firm for which that silly ping pong lover—whose name is Daniel Arsham—works. The place isn’t really used for much beyond sleeping and dressing, so it’s pretty basic. Daniel Arsham – designer from Brooklyn, has created quite a real living room of those same balls. It took as many as 25 thousand of these balls.

Designer Daniel Arsham’s 90-square-foot apartment sits above the office of his design shop Snarkitecture at 60 Box Street in Greenpoint. He calls it Box/Box, and it’s a design experiment as well as his permanent residence. The space is a converted storage loft that now includes a closet and bedroom accessed via a ladder entrance in the floor.

The walls are the impressive thing, though. No less than 25,000 grey and white ping pong balls decorate the walls, transitioning from dark to light as they near the ceiling. The ceiling itself is made of translucent backlit panels, with a skylight and mirrors to create the illusion of space.

The Loftcube is designed as a small, mobile living space that can be easily relocated on a whim. Its light-weight structure can be placed on a roof via a freight helicopter or construction crane. The Loft Cube project is based on the idea of exploiting large, flat and hitherto unused city-centre rooftops. In this way, Werner Aisslinger, a designer in Berlin, is seeking to open up a new, sunny environment with lightweight, mobile housing cells. After two years of preparatory work, the planners presented a prototype of their modular dwelling unit on the roof of the Universal Music building in Berlin. At present, preparations are under way to allow the start of serial production.

A young couple with two children from Mexico City who after living in a conventional home wanted to change to one integrated to nature. This amazing house was build in 2006 by Arquitectura Orgánica. The goal of this project was to make it feel like an internal inhabitant of a snail, like a mollusk moving from one chamber to another, like a symbiotic dweller of a huge fossil maternal cloister.  It’s more of a sculpture than a dwelling.

Taking cues from a Nautilus shell, the house is put together using ferrocement construction, a technique involving a frame of steel-reinforced chicken wire with a special two-inch-thick composite of concrete spread over it, resulting in a structure that’s earthquake-proof and maintenance-free. The open concept inside the house is dominated by smooth surfaces, spiral stairs and natural plantings that makes the inhabitants feel like they’re living inside a snail who swallowed the entire contents of somebody’s back yard. While the house is surrounded on three sides by the bustling Mexico City, its West side has a breathtaking view of the mountains. This interior “grass carpet” is just amazing, leading residents and guests through a network of stone paths to the various areas of the home. The bathroom is simply amazing. In it, you actually feel like you’re under water with the sandy walls, gorgeous blue tiles and the window overhead.  Wow. Maybe someday all houses will be made this way.

There are not words to describe this prison. It is the dirtiest, darkest, and most overcrowded place. The conditions of the ‘streets’ inside the prison were broken and grimy and always covered with trash and dirty water. Behind the ominous barbed wire and high concrete walls of the Santa Martha Acatitla prison in Mexico City, sits a cheerful nursery school with colorful walls, a maze of swings and slides and a playgroup of giggling toddlers. The inmates at the female penitentiary include women serving sentences for murder, drug dealing and kidnapping. There are also about 50 children, living inside the prison with their incarcerated mothers. Iron gates and menacing guard towers loom over sand piles and jungle gyms; outside the mini oasis of a daycare, life is that of a high-security penitentiary. Inside the prison, moms serving long sentences dread the day when their children are tossed out upon turning 6, and many struggle financially to care for them while they are there.

Here you have this seemingly unthinkable scenario and a story screaming to be told in way that disgusts, but also all these glimpses of beauty and gentleness popping up between harsh lines, as if maternity and human instinct know no bounds. Brute and hardened, tattoo-covered women smuggle in weapons and drugs and lash out at each other in the classroom, then melt into calm while in the presence of a child. In working on this piece, I strove to consciously capture these moments of softness, while still conveying the truths of the rough scene they were found in.
Many inmates were ‘homeless’ inside this prison. The mass of humanity milling around was intimidating at first. It was impossible to stay together as a group when moving around the prison. If one of us were to be intentionally separated from the group, we would not have immediately noticed. The free and convicted were walking around together.
Surrounded by various rooms, dormitories, workshops and prison cells. The majority of prisoners are housed in windowless, concrete dorms of about 50 x 20 feet. The prison authority provides no blankets, no beds, and no mattresses: nothing.  When you sleep, you pull up a corner of the concrete floor. Over time and with the help of family, the prisoners have constructed their own little rooms made of a wood frames to which are attached blankets granting some semblance of privacy. The stalls are about 4 x 6 feet, some of which are furnished with beds, cooking equipment, shelving for clothing and one even had a TV although I have no idea how the electrical system was accessed.

Certainly one of the most radical boat designs I’ve ever seen. The two companies unveiled a real-size model of the 38-metre wide vessel late last month in Ancona, Italy. Unusually the width of the yacht is almost two thirds of its 190ft length. Instead of a traditional tapered stern, the WHY has a sheared off appearance, with a 30metre ‘beach’ running along the back. This gives access to a naturally-lit spa, that includes a traditional Turkish Hammam.   It’s not like the usual stern of a boat, it’s more like the real beach of an island; a beach which is protected from the wind and the waves, where you can really relax.’ The naval architect Mauro Sculii said the strange dimensions gave a great stability to the boat. The boat, which is built on three decks, also features a 25metre swimming pool on the bow that hug the contours of the helipad. Inside ‘adaptable living spaces’ are organised around a salon that contains a cinema, a music room, a library and a dining room that opens on to the sea.

The lucky owner has their own 200-square-metre suite that covers the entire third floor and has sweeping views of the sea from its private terrace. Up to 12 guests can stay in the five sumptuous suites on the second floor and their every wish would be carried out by a 20-strong crew. The yacht will cruise at 12knots with a maximum speed of 14knots. Impressively the makers claim it could make four Atlantic crossings without any major maintenance. Any eco-conscious buyer can be reassured that the ship has been designed with three large sky lights and 300 square metres of windows to give a maximum amount of natural light. It will also be fitted with an ultra-low consumption LED lighting system. Solar panels covering the roof and sides of the vessel will help save at least 200 tons of diesel fuel a year. The yacht also comes equipped with waste management systems made to handle both organic and inorganic waste. It will be the first yacht for Hermes who have previously helped design a luxury helicopter and a collection of smart cars

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