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It is well known to all that the houses are built from the ground to the roof. However, there are people who want attention and to emphasize and build their homes inside out … from the roof to the foundation.  Do continue to talk nonsense? You are wrong. The houses are exciting and interesting, this is an artistic design. Would you like to live in one of these homes? Today we bring you the craziest houses in the world – the house upside down.

The Joshua Tree Boulder House proves imagination is still alive and well. Every inch of this 1700 square foot, 2-bed / 2-bath home is intentional, and every design element is deliberate. This magical creation sits on 2.5 acres in Joshua Tree, California. The house is the brainchild of W. Garett Carlson, ASLA, a licensed landscape architect for more than 30 years.  His landscape designs grace Hollywood’s recently remodelled Sunset Marquis Hotel, as well as the gardens of celebrities such as Jack Nicholson, Goldie Hawn, Johnny Depp, Blake Edwards, and more.  The house was built with sustainability in mind, using an intriguing palette of metal, wood, concrete and glass to create a peaceful modern living space where traditional boundaries are dismissed.  Ten-foot high, custom-made floor-to-ceiling pocket glass doors open to create a 40 feet wide expanse that connects the living area to the landscape.  A fire pit to one side of the patio, and a water feature on the other side are both set within boulders to further enhance the experience.  This is indoor/outdoor living at its best.

Exterior

The roof of the house provides insulation in a novel way: up to 18” of soil covers the sloping roof, planted with a wide variety of native California wild flowers and grasses. Seen from above, the roof appears to be a part of its desert landscape. Structural steel I-beams support the 250,000 lb load, designed to withstand a 10-point earthquake. The roof has a 3’ pitch: 11’ on the east side, which also creates the space for the wall to wall 10’ sliding glass doors – down to 8’ on the west side. The pitch also allows the roof garden to drain.
Corrugated steel siding on the house and the garage is the highest gauge and quality available.

Interior

Inside,the floor’s surface was ground smooth , then sprayed with dyes to create a natural-looking surface. The floor was then polished and waxed to create a rich patina. The ceiling is tongue and groove Douglas fir, with several layers of dark stain and varnish to create a deep shine that subtly reflects the finish of the floor.
The kitchen features custom built dark wood and glass cabinets and state-of-the-art appliances. Bathrooms have custom cabinetry, Caesarstone counters. The master bathroom features a deep soaker tub surrounded by blue glass tile. Custom closet – off the master bedroom, a walk-in closet features custom shelving and drawers to maximize the space.

In Norway, the main construction material has always been a tree. High insulating properties of wood allows you to build a good and warm home. Norwegian houses are distinctive in complicated weather conditions. This is of particular interest in Norwegian housing. Like all of the Scandinavian countries, Norway is surrounded by lush nature. Scandinavians are proud that they use elements of nature rather than conquer it. Roofs in Norway have long been covered with turf, which provides excellent protection from frost and winds. Among other things, they also have vegetation on roofs as part of their landscape. These days’ roofs of modern buildings are covered with grass making it a green roof. Companies like Colorado Roof Toppers have seen an increase in green roofs the last few years.

A sod roof or turf roof is a traditional Scandinavian type of green roof covered with sod on top of several layers of birch bark on gently sloping wooden roof boards. Until the late 19th century it was the most common roof on rural log houses in large parts of Scandinavia. Its distribution roughly corresponds to the distribution of the log building technique in the architecture of Finland and the Scandinavian Peninsula. The load of approximately 250 kg per m² of a sod roof is an advantage because it helps to compress the logs and make the walls more draught-proof. In winter the total load may well increase to 400 or 500 kg per m² because of snow.  Sod is also a reasonably efficient insulator in a cold climate. The birch barks underneath ensures that the roof will be waterproof.

A sod roof or turf roof is a traditional Scandinavian type of green roof covered with sod on top of several layers of birch bark on gently sloping wooden roof boards. Until the late 19th century it was the most common roof on rural log houses in large parts of Scandinavia. Its distribution roughly corresponds to the distribution of the log building technique in the vernacular architecture of Finland  and the Scandinavian peninsula. The load of approximately 250 kg per m² of a sod roof is an advantage because it helps to compress the logs and make the walls more draught-proof. In winter the total load may well increase to 400 or 500 kg per m² because of snow.  Sod is also a reasonably efficient insulator in a cold climate. The birch bark underneath ensures that the roof will be waterproof.

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