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Sou Fujimoto, a Japanese architect, designed this small and primitive house to showcase the versatility of lumber. By using large beams that are 350mm sqaure, walls, ceiling, floors and nooks are created. The design of stepped space was a long time fascination of the designer – its defining characteristics of a sort of spatial relativity can not be achieved using coplanar floors. Lumber is extremely versatile. In an ordinary wooden architecture, lumber is effectively differentiated according to functions in various localities precisely because it is so versatile. Columns, beams, foundations, exterior walls, interior walls, ceilings, floorings, insulations, furnishings, stairs, window frames, meaning all. There are no separations of floor, wall, and ceiling here. A place that one thought was a floor becomes a chair, a ceiling, a wall from various positions. The floor levels are relative and spatiality is perceived differently according to one’s position. Here, people are distributed three-dimensionally in the space. This bungalow no longer fits the category of wooden architecture. If wooden architecture is merely something made from wood, then wood itself surpasses the architectural procedures to directly become a “place where people live” in this bungalow.

It is of an existence akin to primitive conditions before architecture. Rather than just a new architecture, this is a new origin, a new existence. Wood is amazingly versatile. Due to its versatility, wood is used in a conventional wooden architecture by intentional differentiation in various places. Not only in structures, such as columns and beams, but it can also be used in everything else from foundation, exterior wall, interior wall, ceiling, flooring, insulation, furniture, stairs to window frames. There are no categorization of floors, walls, and ceilings here. A locality that was thought as a floor transforms into chairs, ceilings, and walls from different perspectives. Floor levels are relative and people reinterpret the spatiality according to where they are. People are three-dimensionally distributed in space and will experience new sensations of depths. Spaces are not divided but is rather produced as a chance occurrence within fusing elements. Inhabitants discover various functions within those undulations. It is a place akin to nebulous landscape. This resonates with the undifferentiated condition of above-mentioned architectonic elements. Both as a constructional methodology and experiential space, this architecture is synthesized by the fusion of various undifferentiated elements. Here, conventional rules of architecture is nullified. There is neither a plan nor a stabilizing point. This is possible purely because the wood is that versatile. Perhaps it is only possible with wood to be simultaneously the insulation and the structure, the finish and also the furniture. By being composed of the wooden blocks instead of slabs, the method of creating the undifferentiated condition was made clear.

These unique boat Kettuvalloms are one of the most important tourist attractions of India, it’s like time travel into a quiet morning of another century. Kettuvalloms have almost everything: bedrooms with terraces, balconies with comfortable seating, bathrooms and even kitchen with private chef. It is some sort of floating hotel for tourists wishing to get acquainted with the memorable sights of India. The Kettuvallom or ‘boat with knots’ is so called because the entire boat is held together with coir knots only – not a single nail is used during the construction. The boat is made of huge planks of Jack wood  or ‘Aanjili’ and joined with coir. This is then coated with a caustic black resin made from boiled cashew kernels.  A portion of the Kettuvallom is covered with a canopy made of the wood from the arecanut tree and bamboo mats and coir and served in the old days as a rest room and kitchen for the crews. Kettuvalloms were formerly used for the transport of goods like rice, spices and coir from the isolated villages of the interior to the towns.  A Kettuvallom, which measures from 20 – 25m in length and from 4m – 4.5m across, can hold up to 30 tons of cargo. Two men punting at each end with long bamboo poles moved these huge barges. With the advent of roads, bridges and modern transportation, these Kettuvallom gradually disappeared from use. There used to be an entire clan of artisans who were involved in Kettuvallom construction.

Made with wooden planks, joined and stitched together with coir ropes and painted on the outside with cashew nut shell oil or fish oil. A distinctive feature of the Kettuvallam  is the design suggesting the possible Chinese influence. These Kettuvallams were used for transporting huge quantities of heavy materials from one place to other. In certain areas Kettuvallams are still used for transferring Coconut Husk, Sand and other goods.  In earlier days since all places were not well connected by roads, Kettuvallams  were the main source of transportation through the Kerala backwaters. It took long journeys ranging from 5 to 6 days, sometimes weeks even to transport things.  Kettuvallams equipped with all modern facilities and requirements are called Houseboats. The houseboat has a living room, a sunbathing deck, and bedrooms with attached European style bath and a kitchen. The boat has solar lamps and fans. Without experiencing and enjoying a houseboat cruise, the trip to Kerala will not be a complete one.
Kettuvallams, the large traditional houseboats are converted into floating luxury dwelling units. These house boats are available in all sizes and shapes, the most popular accommodation type being a suite, having one or two bath attached bedrooms, one living room, kitchenette, an open lounge, deck and a crew comprising oarsmen, a cook and guide. The houseboats are generally powered by a small outboard engine, allowing one to cruise along the backwaters. A recent innovation is a small conference room in a houseboat.

103-year-old Clingstone mansion set on a rock island in Narragansett Bay is owned by Boston architect Henry Wood. Even though the all-wood home with 360-degree view of the ocean is quite old and rough it’s still warm and beautiful. Three stories tall house features 23 rooms, 10 of which are bedrooms. Even though the house is quite expensive to maintain because of it’s made of wood, it still use modern technologies to cut pay bills. Solar panels heat the water, and a wind turbine on the roof generates electricity. Rainwater is collected in a 3,000-gallon cistern, then filtered, treated and pumped through the house for cleaning purposes. Besides that, Clingstone house use the latest technologies in filtering seawater and the most up-to-date composting toilets. The house is maintained by an ingenious method: the Clingstone work weekend. Held every year around Memorial Day, it brings 70 or so friends and Clingstone lovers together to tackle jobs like washing all 65 of the windows. Anne Tait, who is married to Mr. Wood’s son Dan, refinished the kitchen floor on one of her first work weekends. In wintertime, the House on a Rock stands out in the icy gray seascape. The house was abandoned in the 1940’s until it was bought by Henry Wood.

Palais Bulles is a home to famous French stylist Pierre Cardin. Amazing architecture and its size is stunning.
The house is facing the bay of Cannes and has a territory of 1,200m² and gardens, and swimming pools spread on 8,500m ² territory. It is something out of this world, maybe not the most beautiful but I wouldn’t mind to spend there some time. This masterpiece of modern architecture is located 10 km away from Cannes and was built in 1989. Occupies the territory of 1200 square meters. In addition to the villa in the surrounding area are situated amphitheater with 500 seats, a garden with various water  round pools. The house has 28 round bedrooms similar to soap bubbles, beds are also round. Living room with couches of coral color also has spherical shape. There is no pictures at the walls, but floors from wall to wall covered with thick, fluffy carpets. Specially designed illuminators change the light depending on time of the day. As for materials, then, at the insistence of Cardin, instead of traditional wood and metal, it was decided to experiment with plastic, foam, polyester.

The wide panoramic main room opens to the outside with large windows and several openings in the ceiling and walls.  It can accommodate up to 350 people. The furniture is composed of parts of the collection of Pierre Cardin. Everything, from floor to ceiling, from outside to inside, consists of space age spherical forms. The light penetrates the Mediterranean generously by countless windows: a working artist where the shadows play with curves to draw pictures of real light.

Tapestry and chairs, for example, are designed by Pierre Cardin. On the left is the original television from 1971 which is shaped like an eye and can move in all directions. On the right, the oval door opens directly to the swimming pool, offering a magnificent view.

The interior of the Palais Bulles is a maze of corridors, rooms and round prospects. Pierre Carding likes to compare it with the sensual shapes of the body of a woman. Besides a 500-seat amphitheater which hosts various cultural events and parties, the house itself has a reception room, a panoramic lounge and 10 bedroom suites, all designed by contemporary artists.  Outside, a pool, ponds and garden form an area of 8 500 m².

Overlooking the sea, a cascade of soft curves in the colors of the rocks appear in the corners of Théoule-sur-Mer: the Palais Bulles, with its windows glittering in the sun, this architectural masterpiece seems to belong to another world. Located in the town of Théoule-sur-Mer, the house overlooks the Mediterranean Sea and the red cliffs of the Esterel, with a panorama stretching to the bay of Cannes. Antti Lovag has radically changed the vision of architecture and design of living space. By eliminating the right lines, he has adapted the life of human morphology, returning to traditional ways of living.

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